DeVos Learning Center

2016-2017 School Programs
Grades 6-8

AV82-216A 600 8.7mb

Citizenship in Action: Learning from the Example of President Ford and Living Your Civic Duty

Students will learn about the responsibilities of citizenship through the example of President Ford: from his early days as a Boy Scout and teammate to his service in the Navy, the United States Congress, and President of the United States. Students will discover ways in which they can positively engage in their communities and will put this into practice by learning how to contact their elected officials and respectfully communicate their ideas.

Standards Addressed:

  • P.1.4 – Communicate clearly and coherently in writing, speaking, and visually expressing ideas pertaining to social science topics, acknowledging audience and purpose
  • P4.2.2 – Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving a national problem
  • CCSS.ELA.RI.6.7 – Integrate information presented in different media or formats as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue
  • CCSS.ELA.RI.6-8.10 – Read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text
  • 6-7-HI.2 – Use historical inquiry and analysis to study the past
  • 6-8-P4.2.2 – Engage in activities intended to contribute to solving a problem
  • 6-8-P3.1.1 – Clearly state and examine a public policy issue

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Taking a Stand: Making Choices with Integrity

In this two and a half hour program, students will explore how the concept of integrity relates to making a decision when faced with a dilemma and using one’s voice to help solve the problem. The program uses the story of a 1934 football game in which Georgia Tech refused to play the University of Michigan unless Willis Ward, an African American player for U of M, was benched during the game. The future 38th president of the United States, Gerald Ford, was a teammate and friend of Ward’s. Students will examine how Ford faced a dilemma that he later described as a personal crisis as he decided whether or not to play in a football game that excluded a player based solely on race. Students will explore how early experiences can shape our character and will practice putting character into action when they are asked to work together to come up with a solution to a hypothetical problem.

Standards Addressed:

  • K.1.5 – Understand social problems, social structure, institutions, class, groups, and interaction
  • P3.2 – Examine policy issues in group discussions to make reasoned and informed decisions
  • Identify the role of the individual in history and the significance of one person’s ideas.
  • Explain how historians use a variety of sources to explore the past
  • Use cultural institutions to study an era

Click here for pre- and post-visit activities

Ford and Willis Ward

Profile of Courage: How Betty Ford Used her Voice to Enact Positive Change

The increasingly important role of the First Lady will be explored through the example and character of Betty Ford during this two and a half hour program. Students will learn about her courage in sharing her health struggles with the public and her support of the Women’s Rights movement. By exploring primary sources such as letters, print ads, and political cartoons, participants will compare the roles and views of women in the past to those of today. Students will then create their own print ads, aiming to encourage young women to use their voices for good in the spirit of Mrs. Ford.

Standards Addressed:

  • K.1.5 Understand social problems, social structure, institutions, class, groups, and interaction
  • P3.1.1 Use inquiry methods to acquire content knowledge about an issue
  • Explain how historians use a variety of sources to explore the past (e.g., artifacts, primary and secondary sources, etc.)
  • Identify the point of view (perspective of the author) and context when reading and discussing primary and secondary sources
  • Identify the role of the individual in history and the significance of one person’s ideas
  • Use cultural institutions to study an era

Click here for pre- and post-visit activities

betty ford